Tia Ross | Editor | Coach

What readers are saying

Praise for So You Want to Be an Editor . . . But Can You Edit?

This is a come-to-Jesus book on skills, self-worth, and are you sure that you’re sure you’re ready to tackle…whatever. While I’m not an avid reader of business/career books, I’ve not seen such greatness between the covers of a book. Regardless of one’s ultimate field of interest, Tia lays it all on the line—especially in the “Final Thoughts” chapter. The information provided in this must-read is invaluable and life-impacting. My takeaway: Prepare, continuously learn, stay ready, or get a 9-to-5 and just do what the job requires and let some other human being determine your worth.

Anita Summers, Marketing Consultant

Tia is the real deal. So You Wanna Be an Editor...But Can You Edit? is well-written, strongly convicting, and a must-read for editors who want a real shot at winning in this market.

Shaundale Rénā, Developmental Editor & Book Coach

With a clever blend of hard-earned wisdom and dry humor, Ross keeps it real as she shares her career journey and lends her expertise to inspire and instruct aspiring editors on the different types of editing, dealing with clients, and avoiding common pitfalls. With insightful examples, words of encouragement, and links to additional resources, So You Want to Be an Editor . . . But Can You Edit? is a gem for both freelancers and full-timers.

LiVatia “Gwyn” Jordan, Editor, Literary Agent, and Founder—FiBBooks.com

Thank you, Tia Ross, for spelling out clearly in your book that there is much more to being a professional editor than enjoying reading and spotting typos. Tia explains what editors need to know and what experience they need so they can succeed in self-employment. Readers, pay special attention to the checklist in her last chapter about how to determine you’re ready.

Katharine O’Moore-Klopf, Medical Editor & Curator—Copyeditors' Knowledge Base

Tia Ross clearly and succinctly explains the many nuances of effective editing backed by her vast knowledge and experience in the profession. Her straightforward examples of editor types, client scenarios, and training resources are accessible and insightful, and her considerations for both the work and the business of editing are pure gold. If you are considering a career in editing, read this book.

Sherian Brown, Copyeditor & Proofreader

Ross pulls no punches. This veteran editor shows the wannabe freelancer why being a professional editor isn’t a quick-fix career switch. Instead, we must understand the scope of the editorial landscape, our duty of care to clients, and why training is essential. If you want to be an editor, this is the book you read first to ensure you don’t make mistakes later. Highly recommended.

Louise Harnby, Fiction Editor & Co-Host—The Editing Podcast

So You Want to Be an Editor is a blueprint for editorial character, filling the gap between "I want to be an editor" and "How do I become one?" Tia addresses the questions whose answers direct a new editor's initial efforts and determine what kind of editor they will eventually become. Highly recommended.

Christina Frey, Editor & Co-Executive Emeritus of Editorial Freelancers Association

see what the buzz is about

Get a sneak peek

So You Want to Be an Editor . . . But Can You Edit?

Download a free excerpt from the must-read book for aspiring and up-and-coming editors

Looking to share your thoughts on the book?

FEEDBACK IS GREATLY APPRECIATED